Links and Print Version

Area
Employer
Information/Strategies

Health Policy and Management

  • Health Services Administration:
    • Operations
    • Finance
    • Program Development
    • Program Evaluation
    • Management
    • Material Management
    • Human Resources
    • Medical Staff Relations
    • Information Technology
    • Marketing
    • Public Relations
    • Project Management
    • Facilities
    • Patient Care Services
    • Provider Relations
    • Government Relations
    • Strategic Planning
  • Health Policy:
    • Research
    • Analysis
    • Policy Development
    • Legislative Work
    • Lobbying
  • Hospitals
  • Health systems Clinics
  • Medical practice groups
  • Home health agencies
  • Long-term care facilities
  • Mental health facilities
  • Managed care organizations
  • Health finance organizations
  • Insurance companies
  • Pharmaceutical companies
  • Academic medical centers
  • Federal government agencies:
    • Department of Health and Human Services
    • Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
    • Department of Veterans Affairs
    • Food and Drug Administration
    • Office of the Surgeon General
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    • National Institutes of Health
    • Military
  • Legislative offices
  • State government agencies
  • Public health departments (state and local)
  • Advocacy groups
  • Health foundations
  • Professional associations
  • Nonprofit organizations
  • For health services administration, choose an undergraduate major in business, accounting, finance, or management.  For policy-related careers, consider public administration or political science.
  • Gain experience through internships or jobs in a healthcare setting.
  • Develop strong oral and written communication, analytical, and technological skills.
  • Learn how to use database and spreadsheet software.
  • Develop problem-solving skills for finding creative solutions to problems.
  • Learn to work well on teams and cultivate leadership skills.
  • Get involved in student government or campus organizations related to health issues.
  • Earn a master’s degree in public health, health administration, public administration, business, or a related field.
  • To prepare for positions in lobbying and legislation, some will earn a law degree.
  • Join related professional organizations and build a network of contacts.
  • Stay abreast of new laws and regulatory changes in the healthcare industry.


Behavioral and Social Science

  • Quantitative Research
  • Behavioral Research
  • Program Planning
  • Program Implementation
  • Program Evaluation
  • Advocacy
  • Policy
  • Federal government agencies:
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    • Department of Health and Human Services
    • Office of the Surgeon General
  • State government agencies
  • Public health departments (state and local)
  • Nonprofit organizations:
    • American Red Cross
    • American Heart Association
  • Colleges and universities
  • Hospitals
  • Private research foundations
  • Research and development firms
  • International health agencies
  • Research and development firms
  • International health agencies
  • Pursue research experience at the undergraduate level.
  • Become involved in health programming or peer education on campus.
  • Volunteer in the community to gain experience and develop expertise in a particular area or organization.
  • Develop strong public speaking and presentation skills.  Prepare to communicate effectively with both groups and individuals.
  • Learn to work well with diverse populations and people of varying ages.
  • Become familiar with grant writing techniques and grant submission procedures.
  • Earn a graduate degree for advanced research positions.


Health Promotion and Communication

  • Intervention:
    • Planning and Development
    • Implementation
    • Evaluation
  • Health Education:
    • Prevention
    • Promotion
  • Social Marketing:
    • Mass media
    • Web-based
    • Organizational Communication
  • Project Management
  • Federal government agencies:
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    • Department of Health and Human Services
    • Office of the Surgeon General
  • State government agencies
  • Public health departments (state and local)
  • Wellness centers
  • Community mental health centers
  • Corporate wellness programs
  • Fitness facilities
  • Schools
  • Colleges and universities
  • Become involved in health programming or peer education on campus.
  • Volunteer in the community to gain experience and develop expertise in a particular area or organization.
  • Obtain a part-time or summer job with a campus health center or wellness coordinator.
  • Learn to work well with diverse populations and people of varying ages.
  • Develop strong communication skills for building and delivering effective interventions.
  • Gain knowledge of funding sources, grant writing techniques and submission procedures.
  • Research the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) credential.


Biostatistics

  • Research
  • Public Health Surveillance:
    • Data Collection
    • Analysis
    • Interpretation
  • Clinical Trials
  • Data Interpretation and Presentation
  • Federal government agencies:
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    • National Center for Health Statistics
  • State government agencies
  • Public health departments (state and local)
  • Pharmaceutical industry
  • Biotechnology firms
  • Nonprofit organizations
  • Colleges and universities
  • Research institutions
  • Hospitals
  • International health agencies:
    • World Health Organization
  • Choose an undergraduate major in mathematics, statistics, or basic science.  Develop strong quantitative and computing skills.
  • Assist with faculty research projects or apply to a summer research program.
  • Gain experience through related internships. Learn to work well on an interdisciplinary team.
  • Develop strong written and verbal communication skills, as statisticians in this field write technical reports to share findings.
  • Earn a graduate degree in public health/biostatistics.


Epidemiology

  • Research:
    • Design
    • Data Collection
    • Analysis
    • Interpretation
  • Grant Writing
  • Incident/Disease Investigation
  • Risk Assessment
  • Surveillance
  • Technical Writing
  • Federal government agencies:
    • National Institutes of Health
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    • Military
  • State government agencies
  • Public health departments (state and local)
  • World Health Organization (WHO)
  • Private research foundations
  • Pharmaceutical industry
  • Research and development service firms
  • Nonprofit organizations
  • Hospitals
  • Colleges and universities
  • Medical schools
  • Develop a solid background in the biological sciences, statistics, mathematics, and the software utilized for statistical analyses.
  • Gain experience with research.  Volunteer to assist professors with research or apply for summer research programs.
  • Find a topic of interest and seek as much knowledge and experience in that area as possible.
  • Develop strong communication skills for grant and report writing.
  • Plan to work collaboratively with other professionals who study risk factors and disease distribution.
  • Earn a master’s or doctoral degree in public health, epidemiology, or related field.  Some clinical epidemiologists are also MDs.


Environmental Health

  • Research
  • Field Research
  • Air Quality
  • Food Protection
  • Radiation Protection
  • Solid Waste Management
  • Water Quality
  • Noise Control
  • Housing Quality
  • Vector Control
  • Toxicology
  • Occupational Safety
  • Risk Assessment
  • Management
  • Policy Development
  • Consulting
  • Federal government agencies:
    • CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health
    • National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
    • Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
    • Environmental Protection Agency
    • Food and Drug Administration
    • Military
    • Department of Energy
  • State government agencies
  • Public health departments (state and local)
  • Private research facilities
  • Nonprofit organizations
  • Environmental agencies
  • Consulting firms
  • Major in biology, chemistry, or other science area.
  • Develop strong research skills and the ability to manage data.
  • Become involved with environmental-related organizations on campus.
  • Learn to work well with a team of other professionals such as physicians, engineers, and scientists.
  • Read related journals to stay abreast of new trends and legislation in the field.
  • Plan to earn a graduate degree in public health or related field.
  • Research the many specialties to determine interest areas in which to gain experience.


Global Health and Epidemics

  • Social and Economic Development
  • Health Policy
  • Demography
  • Women’s Health
  • Children’s Health
  • Nutrition
  • Design of Healthcare Systems
  • Disease Prevention and Control:
  • Education/Medication
  • Distribution
  • Disaster Relief
  • International organizations:
    • World Health Organization (WHO)
    • United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)
    • United Nations Development Programme
    • Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
    • World Bank
    • USAID
  • Bilateral government development agencies:
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    • Public Health Service
    • Office of International Health
  • Nonprofit organizations:
    • Peace Corps
    • International Red Cross
    • CARE
    • Doctors Without Borders
  • Major in a social science and plan to continue education in public health.
  • Learn one or more foreign languages.
  • Study, volunteer, or intern abroad as much as possible.
  • Participate in international service learning trips or  missions.
  • Volunteer in the local community with health-related issues.
  • Develop excellent research, writing, communication, and organizational skills.
  • Learn to adapt to cultural and racial diversity. Be willing to live and work in third world nations.

 

 


General Information and Strategies

  • Public health is a broad, multi-disciplinary field, and most professionals specialize at the graduate level. Other specialties within public health include  maternal and child health, nutrition, health disparities, and veterinary public health. Additionally, some professionals choose interdisciplinary career paths that involve public health, such as MPH/RN, MPH/JD, MPH/MD, etc.  Learn about all the options through the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH).
  • Seek involvement in undergraduate and community-based public health programs.  Some higher education institutions have peer health educators trained to provide education and support to fellow students.
  • A bachelor’s degree opens the door for entry level opportunities in areas such as health education and promotion and environmental health.
  • A master’s degree is typically required for management, administration, research, policy development, biostatistics, and epidemiology.
  • A doctoral degree is required to reach the highest levels of administration or research and for university teaching positions.
  • Students planning to apply to a public health graduate program will do so through the Schools of Public Health Application Service (SOPHAS).
  • Research the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) and Master Certified Health Education Specialist (MCHES) offered by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc., as these certifications may be preferred or required for some positions.
  • Many opportunities in public health exist with government agencies including: The Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Health Resources and Services Administration, Indian Health Service, National Institutes of Health, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.  Become familiar with government hiring procedures. Obtain a government internship in area of interest.
  • Develop a specialty area of interest via supplemental coursework and/or work experience for greater marketability within that specific career field.
  • Writing, research, and presentation skills are critical in most career fields related to public health.
  • Gain experience working with diverse populations across diverse settings. Learn to work well with others individually and in groups.
  • Technology skills are integrated and demanded across all areas.