Languages, Cultures, and Humanities

Area

Business and Industry

  • Training and development
  • Human resources
  • Equity and diversity
  • Management

  • Marketing
  • Advertising
  • Public relations

  • Sales
  • Consulting
  • Union organizer

Employers

  • Public and private corporations, particularly:
    • Women’s divisions
    • Female focused industries

  • Consulting firms
  • Marketing companies
  • Public relations agencies

  • Organizations for research on and advancement of women in business, (e.g., Catalyst)

Strategies

  • Obtain a minor or double major in business.
  • Earn a graduate degree in an area of interest.
  • Gain experience through internships or other employment.
  • Become current with business and industry literature and news.
  • Stay abreast of current technology.
  • Gain leadership experiences through campus involvement or volunteer work.
  • When job searching, seek employers interested in hiring “any major.”
  • Understand the top skills employers desire and be prepared to demonstrate them, such as communication (oral and written), technology, interpersonal, leadership, and teamwork, etc.
  • Be willing to start in a management-trainee program or other entry-level positions.

Area

Healthcare

  • Medicine specializing in women’s issues:
    • Obstetrics & gynecology
    • Breast cancer
    • Multiple sclerosis
    • Fertility

  • Nursing
  • Physical therapy
  • Occupational therapy

  • Dentistry
  • Public health
  • Medical assistant

Employers

  • Healthcare settings exclusively for women
  • Organizations devoted to women’s health (e.g., National Women’s Health Organization, CDC Women’s Health Department)
  • Hospitals
  • Clinics

  • Private or group practice
  • Wellness centers
  • Nursing homes

  • Mental health institutions
  • Federal, state, or local health departments
  • Centers for reproductive health

Strategies

  • Maintain a high GPA for admission into graduate schools or professional programs.
  • Take prerequisite courses required by graduate programs or obtain a related double major or minor.
  • Meet with a pre-health advisor periodically to discuss curricular decisions.
  • Prepare for and take appropriate admissions tests.
  • Obtain summer jobs, volunteer positions, or internships to test field of interest and gain experience.
  • Talk to professionals in fields of interest and arrange shadowing opportunities.

Area

Human Services

  • Counseling
  • Psychotherapy
  • Mental health services

  • Case management
  • Social work
  • Vocational/career counseling

  • Programming
  • Community relations
  • Administration

Employers

  • Private and group practice
  • Mental health institutions
  • Hospitals and clinics

  • Federal, state, or local government:
    • Department of Human Services
    • Veterans administration
  • Women’s service organizations (e.g., Girl Scouts, Women for Women, AWARE, About-Face, etc)

  • Organizations for women’s aid (e.g., rape crisis, pregnancy support organizations, eating disorder treatment centers, battered women’s shelters, adoption agencies, etc)
  • Youth and family agencies
  • University and college counseling and career centers

Strategies

  • Obtain essential practical experience through part-time or summer jobs and internships.
  • Volunteer with organizations for women’s aid such as crisis hotlines, Big Sisters, women’s resource centers, etc.
  • Learn to work well with different types of people and gain experience working with diverse clientele.
  • Acquire knowledge of government and community resources available for those in need.
  • Earn a graduate degree in fields such as, marriage and family therapy, mental health counseling, social work, counseling psychology, etc. for substantive counseling and administrative roles.
  • Maintain a high GPA and secure strong faculty recommendations.
  • Research state licensure requirements in fields such as counseling and psychology.

Area

Education

  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Information/library science

  • Higher education administration and student support services:
    • Admissions, financial aid, academic advising, development, alumni affairs, international education and study abroad, career services, residence life, student activities and Greek life, orientation, leadership

  • Community education

Employers

  • Universities and colleges
  • Women’s resource centers

  • Non-profit organizations
  • Government programs (e.g., classes for displaced homemakers, parenting, GED prep, etc).

  • Libraries (for women’s studies departments, women’s organizations, museums, etc.)

Strategies

  • Earn a Ph.D. to teach and research in the field of Women’s Studies at four-year institutions.
  • Master’s or Ph.D. is required to teach at two-year colleges.
  • Obtain master’s in library/information science or student affairs if interested in those areas.
  • Join related professional associations as a student member.
  • Gain experience through volunteer work or internships.
  • Seek leadership roles on campus such as peer mentor, resident advisor, or orientation leader.
  • Develop strong communication and public speaking skills.

Area

Writing

  • Journalism
  • Creative writing

  • Freelance writing
  • Copy writing

Employers

  • Newspapers
  • Magazines
  • Broadcast media companies: television and movie industry

  • Trade, professional, or consumer publications
  • Internet sites
  • Advertising agencies

  • Publishing houses
  • Large corporations
  • Self-employment

Strategies

  • Pair an interest in Women’s Studies with communication skills to write about women, write on topics of interest to women, or for publications targeting a female audience.
  • Obtain a minor in English or journalism or take some general writing-focused classes.
  • Write for campus publications such as college newspapers, magazines, or department/program newsletters.
  • Volunteer to assist or tutor students in a writing center.
  • Create a portfolio of writing samples, especially those that have been published.
  • Seek opportunities for recognition and networking through writing contests and freelance writing submissions.
  • Become familiar with the proposal and submission process involved in freelance writing.

Area

Nonprofit

  • Administration
  • Program management and development
  • Fund raising/development

  • Grant writing
  • Research
  • Policy analysis

  • Volunteer coordination
  • Community education
  • Public relations and marketing

Employers

  • Nonprofit organizations
  • Social service agencies
  • Hospitals and medical centers
  • Private foundations (e.g., The Ford Foundation)

  • International organizations (e.g., The World Health Organization, The International Red Cross)
  • Special interest groups
  • Trade or professional associations
  • Libraries

  • Educational institutions
  • Cultural heritage organizations
  • Women’s service organizations
  • Human rights organizations

Strategies

  • Seek multiple volunteer and internship positions to gain experience and build contacts in the field.
  • Obtain leadership roles in relevant campus and community organizations.
  • Develop strong communication and research skills. Learn how to write grants and gain an understanding of budgeting and fiscal management.
  • Investigate term of service or service corps positions as a way to gain entry into the field.
  • Research organizations’ values to find a good fit with yours.
  • Consider earning a graduate degree for more job opportunities and advancement.

Area

Law and Politics

  • Law
    • Corporate practice
    • Public interest law
    • Civil law (e.g., family, discrimination, sexual harassment, etc.)

  • Lobbying
  • Government relations
  • Legislative aid
  • Elected or appointed leadership
  • Public policy

  • Research
  • Intelligence
  • Campaign management
  • Special interest advocacy
  • Program administration

Employers

  • Law firms
  • Corporate legal departments
  • Public defenders offices
  • District attorneys

  • Government agencies
  • Public interest groups
  • Legal aid

  • Sole practitioner
  • Lobbying groups
  • Women’s advocacy organizations

Strategies

  • Supplement curriculum with relevant courses to enhance research and writing skills.
  • Maintain a high GPA.
  • Prepare for and take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT).
  • Participate in activities that develop strong debate and public speaking skills such as mock trial.
  • Run for office in student government or work on a political campaign.
  • Gain relevant experience through jobs or internships with law firms or government agencies.
  • Obtain the J.D. for law positions or an advanced degree in political science or public administration for government positions.

General Information

  • Women’s Studies provides a broad, liberal arts background that helps build skills in critical thinking and problem solving, data collection and analysis, oral, written and presentation skills, and cooperative teamwork skills.
  • Women’s studies also provides in-depth knowledge of the conditions of women in various cultures and societies, gender dynamics, strategies and organizational skills needed to address gender inequalities, women’s struggles, achievements, and contributions in past and present societies and across cultures, the courses and consequences of women’s subordination, gender-based assumptions and biases and their consequences, social change agents, and sensitivity to social concerns and other view points.
  • Women’s Studies also explores how intersecting oppressions such as racism, sexism, and ableism are comparable and intertwined. It works to address the systemic problems that create oppression.
  • Some students may choose to study Women’s Studies because they enjoy the subject but wish to pursue careers requiring “any major.” In this scenario, it is critical to develop desirable skills through internships, part-time or summer jobs, or volunteer experiences.
  • Women’s Studies majors are excellent candidates for a number of graduate school options because of their broad liberal arts background as well as specific interests that may set them apart from other students. For those wishing to pursue graduate education, maintain a high GPA, establish relationships with faculty to secure strong recommendations, and gain experience through volunteer, work, or research opportunities.

Area

Government

  • Demography
  • Social statistics
  • Public administration
  • Policy analysis
  • Research

  • Community development
  • Program development
  • Human services
  • City planning
  • City and town management

  • Law enforcement
  • Lobbying
  • Political campaigns
  • Journalism

Employers

  • Federal departments and agencies such as:
    • Departments of Agriculture, Education, Interior, Commerce, Defense
    • Health and Human Services
    • Drug Enforcement Administration
    • Environmental Protection Agency
    • Housing and Urban Development Veterans Affairs
    • National Institutes of Health
    • National Institute of Aging

  • State and local government
  • Planning and development commissions
  • National, state, or local parks or recreation departments
  • National, state, or local news sources

  • Housing authorities
  • Transportation departments
  • Social service agencies
  • Peace Corps and Americorps

Strategies

  • Supplement curriculum with coursework in statistics and social research. Consider obtaining a minor in political science, public administration, or other relevant field.
  • Develop exceptional computer, communication, and research skills.
  • Complete an internship with the federal government.
  • Seek leadership roles in relevant campus or community organizations (e.g., IBM SMARTER Cities).
  • Develop a specialty such as aging, family, criminal justice, or healthcare.
  • Become familiar with the government application process. Utilize applicable websites and seek assistance from your college career center.
  • There are a large number of specialized agencies within the federal government. Do extensive research to find the area that best fits your interests.
  • Earn a graduate degree to qualify for more job opportunities.

Area

Regional and Urban Planning

  • Transportation
  • Demography
  • Housing
  • Community development
  • Program development

  • Historic preservation
  • Urban design
  • Architecture
  • Urban renewal

  • Environmental/Regulatory issues
  • Economic development
  • Land use
  • Research design

Employers

  • Federal, state, and local government
  • Architecture firms
  • Engineering firms
  • Local planning agencies
  • Real estate and development contractors

  • Investment companies
  • Transportation agencies
  • Zoning administration
  • Utility companies

  • Non-profit organizations
  • Historical restoration or preservation agencies
  • Neighborhood revitalization initiatives
  • International development organizations

Strategies

  • Enhance curriculum with courses in business, social sciences, and statistics.
  • Earn a graduate degree in urban or regional planning from an accredited planning program.
  • Gain experience through internships with employers of interest.
  • Develop strong computer skills.
  • Learn another language to communicate with diverse community members or to work abroad.
  • Plan to work corroboratively with a wide array of professionals and local citizens.
  • Understand that most planners work for local governments.

Area

Nonprofit

  • Administration/Management
  • Fund raising/Development
  • Public relations
  • Policy analysis

  • Research
  • Grant writing
  • Community development
  • Advocacy

  • Programming
  • Direct service:
    • Counseling
    • Case management

Employers

  • Community service agencies
  • Advocacy groups
  • Federal, state, and local government
  • United Way agencies

  • Religiously-affiliated service organizations
  • Private foundations
  • Adoption and child care agencies
  • Nursing homes and retirement communities

  • Hospitals and wellness centers
  • Halfway houses
  • Vocational services
  • Educational information services

Strategies

  • Gain experience and develop helping skills through volunteer positions.
  • Spend summers working at camps, The YMCA, or other social service agencies.
  • Work with diverse populations to get exposure to multi-cultural issues. Learn a second language in order to interact with non-English speakers and increase marketability.
  • Develop excellent communication skills.
  • Concentrate course work in an area of interest such as youth, gerontology, or poverty.
  • Serve as a peer mentor, resident assistant, or other student leadership position.
  • Investigate term of service or service corps positions as a way to gain entry into the field.
  • Earn a master’s degree in social work, counseling, or other related field to increase employment opportunities.
  • Most states require licensure or certification for positions involving the direct provision of therapeutic services to clients.
  • Research organizations’ values to find a good fit with yours. Become knowledgeable about and committed to the work you plan to do.

Area

Business

  • Real estate:
    • Construction, management, development, sales, leasing, consulting

  • Management
  • Sales
  • Finance

  • Human resources
  • Underwriting and claims management
  • Market research

Employers

  • Real estate firms
  • Rental properties
  • Construction and development companies
  • Insurance firms
  • Retail stores

  • Banks
  • Staffing agencies
  • Manufacturing companies
  • Credit management companies and organizations

  • Service industries
  • Healthcare organizations
  • Consulting firms
  • Other business corporations

Strategies

  • Earn a minor in business or supplement curriculum with courses in accounting, finance, and management.
  • Gain business experience through part-time jobs, summer work, and internships.
  • Develop excellent computer skills. Learn to use software applications such as spread sheets, databases, and word processing.
  • Hone written and oral communication skills.
  • Join related professional associations.
  • Seek leadership roles in student organizations.

Area

Law

  • Prosecution
  • Defense
  • Contractual

  • Corporate
  • Nonprofit or public interest
  • Government

  • Mediation
  • Law assistance
  • Other specialties

Employers

  • Federal, state, and local government
  • Private practice
  • Corporations

  • Special interest groups
  • Universities and colleges
  • Legal aid societies

  • Nonprofit and public interest organizations, (e.g., ACLU, NAACP) Legal Defense Fund, Legal Services Corporation
  • Legal clinics
  • Other private legal services

Strategies

  • Develop strong research skills and attention to detail.
  • Participate in debate or forensic team to hone communication skills.
  • Choose courses or a minor to specialize in a particular area of law, (e.g., a minor in business for a career in corporate law).
  • Shadow an attorney to learn more about the field and various specialties.
  • Get involved in pre-law organizations.
  • Plan to attend law school and earn a law degree (J.D.).
  • Maintain a high grade point average and secure strong faculty recommendations. Prepare for the LSAT (Law School Admission Test).
  • Obtain specialized certification for paralegal positions.

Area

Education

  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Administration
  • Library sciences

  • Student affairs:
    • Student activities, leadership development, admissions, orientation, career services, residence life, multi-cultural affairs, study abroad, international student services

  • Academic affairs
    • Academic support services
    • Advising
    • Educational advancement programs
    • Honors programs

Employers

  • Colleges and universities

  • Vocational-technical educational programs

  • Adult education providers

Strategies

  • Earn a graduate degree for post-secondary teaching & research.
  • Assist a professor with research and take extra courses in research and statistics.
  • Develop exceptional written and oral communication and interpersonal skills.
  • Secure strong personal recommendations, particularly from professors, and maintain a high GPA.
  • Earn a master’s degree in a specialized area (e.g., College Student Personnel, Higher Education Administration, or Library and Information Sciences to work in other roles at post-secondary institutions).
  • Seek campus leadership positions such as peer mentor, orientation leader, or resident assistant.

Area

Social Science Research

  • Data analysis
  • Demography

  • Market research
  • Clinical research

  • Information sourcing
  • Publishing

Employers

  • Universities
  • Government agencies
  • Research institutes
  • Non-profit organizations

  • Private industries
  • Advertising and marketing firms
  • Consulting organizations

  • Information brokers
  • Newspapers, magazines, news agencies
  • Public opinion research polls

Strategies

  • Develop exceptional quantitative, statistical, and writing skills through coursework and research projects.
  • Learn to use statistics software packages as well as database and spreadsheet programs.
  • Earn a minor in statistics to assist in research analysis.
  • Volunteer to help a professor with research or complete an independent study.
  • Gain experience working on teams.
  • Network with professionals working in areas of interest.
  • Consider earning a graduate degree in one of the social sciences, statistics, or related field to qualify for more positions.

General Information

  • Urban Studies majors develop an understanding of modern cities, as well as the social, historical, political, economic, and cultural forces shaping urban areas.
  • Urban Studies is an interdisciplinary program that draws upon fields such as sociology, economics, and political science.
  • Consider earning a second major or minor in another field of interest.
  • Many transferable skills such as analytical, organizational, research, interpersonal, computer, leadership, teamwork, and oral/written communication are associated with the urban studies degree.
  • Internships, part-time jobs, summer jobs, and/or volunteer experiences are critical for gaining experience and developing a career path.
  • An undergraduate degree is sufficient for entry-level positions in business, non-profit, and government sectors, however a graduate degree is likely to be more desirable in a competitive market.
  • An undergraduate degree in urban studies is good preparation for graduate or professional education in law, planning, architecture, business, public policy, social sciences, and other related fields. Research pre-requisites for graduate or professional programs of interest.
  • To enhance graduate or professional school opportunities, maintain a high grade point average, secure strong faculty recommendations, join student or professional organizations, and gain relevant experience outside of the classroom through work, internship, volunteer, and research opportunities.
  • A Ph.D. is required for teaching at four-year universities.
  • Conduct informational interviews with professionals working in areas of interest.

Area

Performing

  • Stage
  • Television
  • Radio

  • Motion Picture
  • Video

Employers

  • Community theaters
  • Regional theaters
  • Commercial theaters
  • Summer stock theaters
  • Dinner theaters
  • Children’s theaters
  • Repertory companies

  • University theater groups
  • Touring companies
  • Industrial shows
  • Show groups
  • Amusement and theme parks
  • Television/film studios

  • Radio Stations
  • Nightclubs
  • Cabarets
  • Cruise lines
  • Acting conservatories
  • Public or community programs

Strategies

  • Participate in acting workshops, courses, and seminars to get advice and experience and to make contacts with others in the field.
  • Join unions, (e.g., Actors Equity Union, or actors’ guilds to stay abreast of opportunities and developments in the field).
  • Get as much acting experience as possible. Perform in school productions, community theater, summer stock, etc. to hone acting skills.
  • Pursue training through acting conservatories or mentoring from a drama coach.
  • Develop a wide range of skills, such as singing, dancing, or acrobatics to be more versatile.
  • Gain related experience by working in a college radio or television station.
  • Consider getting modeling experience.
  • Learn a foreign language and train with a dialect coach.
  • Prepare a professional resume that lists your acting experience. Have your resume attached to or printed on the reverse side of an 8″ x 10″ photograph of yourself.
  • Be prepared to make the rounds. Distribute your resume to numerous agencies and offices. Follow up with several personal visits.
  • Secure an agent or manager to help find jobs.
  • Be aware that more opportunities exist in large cities such as New York and Los Angeles.
  • Learn about the entertainment industry as a whole.
  • Take courses on entertainment law, business, management, etc.
  • An extensive network of contacts is essential. Get to know people working in your field and related areas.
  • Consider whether you want to pursue acting as a full-time job or as an avocational interest.

Area

Directing

  • Direction
  • Technical direction
  • Casting

  • Set design
  • Stage management
  • Production

  • Dialect coaching
  • Dramaturgy
  • Support staff

Employers

  • Theaters of varying types
  • Television and motion picture studios

  • Video production companies
  • Other performance venues

Strategies

  • Seek formal training and experience in acting first.
  • Develop leadership skills through participation in campus and community organizations.
  • Gain both directing and technical experience by participating in college productions. Seek technical experiences in local theaters.
  • Participate in the Director’s Guild Training Program.
  • Volunteer with directors in local theaters to become familiar with the environment. Serving as an assistant is a great way to get started in this area.
  • Experience with fund-raising is important. Volunteer to do this with local theaters and arts councils.
  • Learn what types of permits and insurance are needed to film or perform in certain areas.

Area

Behind the Scenes

  • Stage management
  • Stage direction
  • Set design/construction
  • Costume design

  • Hair/Make-up
  • Special effects
  • Wardrobe
  • Prop management

  • Broadcast technology
  • Rigging
  • Electrical work
  • Carpentry/Scenic artistry

Employers

  • Community theaters
  • Regional theaters
  • Commercial theaters
  • Summer stock theaters
  • Dinner theaters
  • Children’s theaters

  • Repertory companies
  • University theater groups
  • Touring companies
  • Industrial shows
  • Show groups
  • Amusement and theme parks

  • Television/film studios
  • Radio stations
  • Nightclubs
  • Cabarets
  • Cruise lines
  • Acting conservatories
  • Public or community programs

Strategies

  • Learn to work well on a team.
  • Develop a sense of artistry and creativity.
  • Become involved in the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE). This organization can give you information about becoming an apprentice as well as help you make valuable contacts.
  • Get experience. Offer your services to school and local theaters.
  • Read industry magazines and books to learn about your area.
  • For sound design: Become familiar with computer technology as digital sound effects and electronic music replace traditional means of sound design.
  • Take courses in computers, math, and physics.
  • For costume design: Supplement your program with courses in art history and fashion design.
  • For set design: Take courses in architecture and design.
  • Learn about different eras in history in order to recreate on stage. A basic knowledge of history and architecture is helpful.

Area

Writing

  • Scriptwriting
  • Playwriting

  • Screenwriting
  • Journalism

  • Publicity (press agents)
  • Research

Employers

  • Theaters
  • Television/film studios
  • Television stations

  • Radio stations
  • Video production companies
  • Magazines

  • Newspapers
  • Freelance

Strategies

  • Take courses in English and journalism to hone writing skills.
  • Review plays, movies, and TV shows for school or local newspaper.
  • Get as much writing experience as possible. Write for the college newspaper, enter playwriting contests, etc.
  • See many different productions and shows. Read a variety of scripts to see how they are developed.
  • Gain experience as a freelance writer or editor in other employment settings.
  • Learn how to shoot film because screenwriters will typically “shoot script” in which a synopsis of a story is prepared so directors can make recommendations.
  • Theatrical press agents publicize and promote theatrical productions. They write press releases and arrange press conferences and other media events. Take courses in related areas such as public relations, advertising, and business to prepare for this field.
  • Reporters spend time on the set absorbing everything. They interview actors as well as craftspeople.
  • Researchers gather information for movie writers.
  • They may also track down photographs or historical documents to make the film more authentic.

Area

Business

  • Producing
  • Management
  • Agents
  • Marketing and advertising

  • Fundraising and development
  • Coordination of volunteers
  • Administration of arts programs

 

  • Box office sales
  • Promotions
  • Patron services

Employers

  • Theaters
  • Arts councils
  • Television/film studios
  • Broadway

  • Road company productions
  • Regional theaters
  • Stock productions
  • Dinner theaters

  • Cabarets
  • Talent agencies
  • Advertising agencies
  • Art museums

Strategies

  • Secretarial/clerical positions in theaters and studios are often stepping-stones to other positions and a good way to make contacts.
  • Gain undergraduate training in business, public relations, communications, advertising, and theater.
  • Complete an internship in area of interest.
  • Develop skills in leadership, negotiation, budgeting, and fundraising.
  • Get as much experience on the college and local level as possible to develop a strong resume.

Area

Education

  • Private instruction
  • Teaching

  • Research
  • Self-enrichment teaching

Employers

  • Public and private schools, K-12
  • Colleges and universities

  • Performing arts centers
  • Various types of theater

  • Freelance
  • Self-employed

Strategies

  • For K-12, obtain certification for the state in which you wish to teach. Obtain dual certification for more teaching opportunities.
  • Get experience in various areas of theater and working with young people.
  • Obtain a graduate degree to teach on the college level.
  • Develop one or two areas of expertise within theater arts.
  • Join the National Association of Dramatic and Speech Arts or the Association for Theater in Higher Education.

General Information

  • Complete an internship or an apprenticeship with a local theater. Participate in summer stock. Gain as much experience as possible.
  • Network: Talk with people working in the field to find out about jobs and opportunities. Join professional groups to make contacts.
  • Read newspapers and periodicals related to theater to keep up with new developments. Read the “trades”–magazines and newspapers that report events in the entertainment industry. Read the “Theater” section of daily newspapers to find out about upcoming productions.
  • Join a relevant union or guild to be eligible for work assignments.
  • Get involved with productions any way you can to get your foot in the door. Be prepared to do various tasks assigned by stage managers or producers.
  • Volunteer with fundraising efforts for the arts.
  • Be aware of scams. Check out the legitimacy of agencies and companies before paying any fees.
  • Relocate to a metropolitan area where more opportunities exist.
  • A career in the arts takes patience, dedication, and luck!  Take advantage of unexpected opportunities!
  • Have a back-up plan. Understand that actors and directors may face frequent and long periods of unemployment. Develop skills that qualify you for other jobs while you wait for opportunities. Consider pairing theater with another career interest or major to open up more career possibilities.  Many actors work in theater management or production.
  • Theater helps students develop verbal and written communication, public speaking, and teamwork skills. These transferable skills are valued by many types of employers. In particular, positions in sales, marketing, management, and public relations may be open to students with theater degrees.  Learn how to discuss and demonstrate these skills in interviews.
  • There are many ways to be involved in theater arts while working in another career field if you choose not to pursue theater as your way to make a living.

Area

International Areas

  • Humanitarian services
  • Development:
    • Economic
    • Community
  • Disaster/Disease relief

  • Policy development
  • Program administration
  • Volunteer coordination
  • Peace keeping or peacebuilding
  • Conflict resolution/Management

  • Diplomacy/Faith based diplomacy
  • Public service:
    • Foreign affairs
    • International security
  • International law

Employers

  • International aid and relief organizations
  • NGO’s (Non-governmental Organizations), (e.g., Amnesty International)
  • Nonprofit and not-for-profit organizations (e.g., Vital Voices or Habitat for Humanity)

  • Federal government agencies with an international focus [e.g., Peace Corps, USAID and the Foreign Service (State Department)]
  • Private voluntary organizations
  • Humanitarian organizations (e.g.,International Red Cross and CARE)

  • Religious organizations (e.g., World Vision)
  • National Security Council
  • United Nations
  • Think tanks

Strategies

  • Many international organizations value the historical and contemporary context of religions and cultures that one learns in religious studies.
  • Learn one or more foreign languages.
  • Plan to study, volunteer, or intern abroad more than one time if possible.
  • Seek cultural experiences on campus and get involved with the international student population.
  • Join relevant student organizations such as Amnesty International and gain leadership roles.
  • Develop excellent research, writing, communication, and organizational skills.
  • Participate in an international service learning experience or go on a mission trip.
  • Federal international jobs require careful observation of a formal hiring procedure. Apply for a federal government internship.
  • Government work in the foreign service requires passage of the Foreign Service Exam and adherence to a list of requirements.
  • Research the international organization/agency’s structure and function.
  • Volunteer at relevant local social service agencies to gain experience and demonstrate interest.
  • Develop good working knowledge of international humanitarian law.
  • Demonstrate your depth of dedication, willingness to adapt, and coping mechanisms to combat stress and difficult situations
  • Earn first aid certification to assist in disaster relief work with organizations such as the Red Cross.
  • Develop skills in the areas of organizing groups, efficiency, and the ability to calm people.
  • Earn a graduate degree in an area of interest to open more job opportunities. Religious studies provides a good background for a variety of graduate programs.

Area

Education

  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Student affairs administration

  • Multicultural programming
  • Programs/Study abroad administration
  • Library/Information sciences

  • Religious life programming
  • Campus ministry

Employers

  • Secondary schools
  • Private, public, or religiously affiliated colleges and universities
  • Schools of theology/seminaries

  • Organizations (e.g., Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Campus Crusade for Christ, Muslim Student Association, Hillel)
  • Buddhist Monasteries (e.g., Chuang Yen Monastery)

Strategies

  • Earn a doctorate degree for teaching and research in colleges and universities. Earn a master’s degree in a relevant field for positions in student affairs administration or library/information sciences.
  • Earn certification/licensure to teach in public secondary schools. Choose a double major in an area such as history.
  • Complete Master of Divinity plus additional training for campus ministry.
  • Master of Divinity and Ph.D., D.Min. or Th.D. usually required for teaching, research and administration in seminaries and schools of theology.
  • Focus on a specialization such as Women’s Studies in Religion during graduate school to further employability.
  • Seek campus leadership positions such as Peer Mentor, Resident Assistant, or Orientation Leader.
  • Volunteer to assist a faculty member with research.
  • Develop relationships with faculty to secure strong recommendations.
  • Maintain a strong grade point average to gain admittance into graduate school.
  • Learn to speak a second language if planning to pursue a graduate degree in religious studies. Choose a language that will be particularly relevant to your interests.

Area

Business

  • Human resources:
    • Training and development
    • Recruitment
    • Equity and diversity functions

  • Management
  • Sales

  • Marketing
  • Public relations

Employers

  • Insurance firms
  • Retail stores

  • Banks and financial institutions
  • Staffing agencies

  • Service industries
  • Other large corporations

Strategies

  • Learn how to sell your religious studies major to business employers that value employees who understand and appreciate cultural diversity.
  • Double major or minor in business.
  • Gain related experience through internships or summer and part-time jobs.
  • Get involved in relevant student organizations and seek leadership roles.
  • Develop the ability to write and speak persuasively, as well as adapt content for diverse populations
  • Learn how to use relevant software including those for spreadsheets, presentations, and databases.

Area

Communications and Arts

  • Writing
  • Editing
  • Publishing
  • Television/Film
  • Radio

  • Advertising
  • Public relations
  • Sales
  • Commercial art
  • Website design

  • Event planning
  • Museum work:
    • Curatorship
    • Exhibition design

Employers

  • Secular publishing houses
  • Secular radio, television, and film producers
  • Newspapers
  • Websites

  • Denominational boards/agencies
  • Interdenominational organizations
  • Denominational publishing houses of books and magazines
  • Local churches, synagogues, and mosques

  • Advertising and public relation agencies
  • Museums
  • Galleries

Strategies

  • Plan to complete one or more internships in this area to prepare for a professional job and to build a network of relevant professionals.
  • Take courses in English, journalism, art  history, or photography depending upon interest area.
  • Develop excellent writing and editing skills.
  • Work for the campus newspaper, radio station, or tv station.
  • Submit articles for publication in religious and nonreligious papers and journals.
  • Learn web design and desktop publishing.
  • Obtain specialized technical training such as a double major or minor in broadcasting or graphic design for work in those fields.
  • Develop a portfolio of writing samples.
  • Display good planning, organizational, interpersonal, and public speaking skills, and learn to think creatively.
  • Move to larger metropolitan areas for more jobs, and be willing to relocate for promotions.
  • Consider freelance positions to work in journalism.
  • Earn a graduate degree for museum work.

Area

Social Services

  • Case management
  • Counseling
  • Rehabilitation
  • Administration
  • Vocational training

  • Volunteer services
  • Programming
  • Advocacy
  • Crisis services (e.g., pregnancy, housing, etc.)

  • Church-based organizing/Community development
  • Fundraising
  • Grant writing
  • Law

Employers

  • Nonprofit and social services organizations: United Way, Red Cross, Goodwill Industries, Salvation Army, etc.
  • Immigrant and refugee service providers
  • Migrant service providers

  • Hospitals and hospices
  • Residential treatment facilities
  • Correctional institutions
  • Shelters

  • Nursing homes and assisted living facilities
  • Youth organizations and camps: YMCA, YWCA, Young Life, Campus Life, etc.
  • Churches, synagogues, and mosques
  • Lobby agencies

Strategies

  • Volunteer with local organizations to gain experience working with a wide variety of people from various backgrounds. Develop multicultural competence.
  • Obtain excellent interpersonal and oral and written communication skills.
  • Plan to earn a graduate degree in counseling, social work, or psychology to provide therapy or counseling to clients.
  • Complete an internship or part-time job in an organization of interest to gain experience and develop contacts.
  • Find ways to develop fundraising and grant writing skills. These are valued by nonprofit agencies.
  • Learn a language such as Spanish to work with immigrant and migrant populations.
  • Earn a joint degree in divinity and law to work in legal fields related to religious freedom issues.

Area

Religiously Affiliated Areas

  • Clergy and other religious leaders:
    • Buddhist, Catholic, Jewish, Protestant, Islamic, Hindu, Greek Orthodox
  • Vocation as Monk or Nun
  • Chaplaincy:
    • Military
    • Institutional

  • Mission work:
    • Church development
    • Community or agricultural development
    • Educational
    • Medical
    • Metropolitan
    • Evangelism

  • Local ministries:
    • Youth ministries
    • Adult ministries
    • Leisure ministries
    • Counseling/Recovery
    • Religious education
    • Day care, children and adult
    • Food bank/Emergency einistries
    • Family life center management
  • Music-oriented ministries
  • Religious camp administration

Employers

  • Local churches, synagogues, mosques
  • Religious organizations
  • Religious communities, (e.g., convents and monasteries)
  • Religious retreat centers, Christian and Buddhist
  • Denominational boards and agencies
  • Monasteries

  • All branches of military service
  • Hospitals, hospices
  • Homes for children, youth, senior citizens
  • Correctional institutions
  • Police and fire departments
  • Missions boards

  • Local churches
  • Evangelical organizations (e.g., Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, Operation Christmas Child)
  • Religious-based camps and youth programs, (e.g., Young Life)

Strategies

  • Obtain general knowledge of practices, procedures, guidelines, and doctrine of one’s faith.
  • Gain an understanding of human spiritual and social needs. Demonstrate an openness to learn about other people’s faith and multiple perspectives from different backgrounds.
  • Research requirements to enter leadership in the faith you want to pursue. Master of Divinity and denominational ordination are required for most clergy positions, for example.
  • Possess high moral and ethical standards.
  • Develop leadership ability and self discipline.
  • Hone communication skills, both oral and written.
  • To become a chaplain, obtain ordination and two years service in local church or after acceptance into branch of military service, attend chaplaincy school.
  • Earn any needed advanced degrees, certification, or licensing in area of interest for missions.
  • Seek related experience by participating with missions groups.
  • Gain travel and cultural experience with group of interest. Foreign language skills are a plus.
  • Develop fundraising and budgeting skills.
  • People interested in religious vs. secular work possess deep faith, want more than filling one’s own personal needs, and desire to make a difference.
  • Often more opportunities for specific ministries exist in urban areas and large religious institutions.
  • Obtain experience and contacts through extensive involvement in campus organizations or local religious institutions. Leadership on the local, state, and regional level is crucial.
  • Seek camp experience to improve organization and counseling skills as well as network within the denominational / organizational structure.
  • Learn to work well with people of all different backgrounds and socioeconomic status.
  • Earn dual degrees where appropriate, (e.g., music).

General Information

  • Religious studies equips students with an understanding of global issues and trends in both historical and contemporary contexts. This understanding of multiculturalism and interculturalism is valued by a wide variety of employers in many industries including education, government, and business.
  • Student who seek international careers may find that religious studies provides a good background in global issues.
  • Many transferable skills such as analyzing and synthesizing data, research, communication skills, and critical thinking are associated with the religious studies degree.
  • People who major in religious studies may or may not consider themselves “religious.” Expertise in religious ideas can be a plus for secular work environments as well as more traditional religious ones.
  • An undergraduate degree prepares students for professional and graduate study in business, law, medicine, counseling, higher education, and other fields. Check for prerequisite classes needed to enter various graduate programs.
  • Obtaining relevant experience through internships or volunteer experiences is critical to finding employment opportunities. Dual majors or minors can also help open the door in some fields.
  • Join relevant organizations and seek leadership roles.

Area

Education

  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Administration

  • Student Affairs
    • Student activities, leadership development, admissions, orientation, career services, residence life, multi-cultural affairs, study abroad, international student services

  • Academic affairs
    • Academic support services
    • Advising
    • Educational advancement programs
    • Honors programs
  • Library sciences

Employers

  • Colleges and universities
  • Professional or graduate schools, including medical

  • Adult education programs
  • Vocational-technical educational programs

Strategies

  • Obtain a doctorate degree to teach at colleges and universities. Maintain a high GPA and secure strong faculty recommendations to prepare for graduate school.
  • Develop one or more concentration(s), such as mathematics, medical or business ethics, science, or religion.
  • Become an effective writer.
  • Earn a master’s degree in a specialized area (e.g., College Student Personnel, Higher Education Administration, or Library and Information Sciences to work in other roles at post-secondary institutions).
  • Seek campus leadership positions such as peer mentor, orientation leader, or resident assistant.
  • Build strong interpersonal skills.

Area

Ethics

  • Teaching
  • Research

  • Medical/Clinical
  • Bioethics

  • Environmental
  • Law-related

Employers

  • Hospitals
  • Medical and professional schools
  • Colleges and universities
  • Bioethic centers

  • Research institutes
  • Medical organizations (e.g., American Medical Association)
  • Health science funding agencies

 

  • Environmental agencies
  • Law firms specializing in health or bioethics
  • Consulting services

Strategies

  • Plan to obtain a doctorate in philosophy for academic research and teaching positions. Some hospitals and healthcare organizations prefer to hire individuals who also have a clinical background in nursing or medicine. Another potential educational path is to earn a law degree.
  • Complete an internship in a relevant setting while in graduate school to gain experience.
  • Participate in professional organizations in ethics.
  • Develop excellent research skills as well as verbal and written communication skills.
  • Demonstrate commitment to ethical issues through involvement and volunteer experiences.
  • Investigate interdisciplinary degrees in bioethics offered at some universities.

  • Prosecution
  • Defense
  • Contractual

  • Corporate
  • Nonprofit or public interest
  • Government

  • Mediation
  • Other specialties
  • Law assistance

Employers

  • Law firms
  • Federal, state, and local government
  • Private practice
  • Corporations

  • Special interest groups
  • Universities and colleges
  • Legal aid societies

  • Nonprofit and public interest organizations
    • ACLU
    • NAACP Legal Defense Fund
    • Legal Services Corporation
  • Legal clinics
  • Other private legal services

Strategies

  • Plan on attending law school or a paralegal training school/program depending on area of interest.
  • Develop strong research skills and attention to detail.
  • Participate in debate or forensic team to hone reasoning, communication and critical thinking skills.
  • Choose courses or a minor to specialize in a particular area of law (e.g., a minor in business for a career in corporate law).
  • Gain experience and build skills through part-time or summer work in a law firm or an organization related to your particular interests.
  • Shadow an attorney to learn more about the field and various specialties.
  • Get involved in pre-law and mock trial organizations.
  • Volunteer with a public advocacy group. Seek experience with mediation and conflict resolution.
  • Maintain a high GPA and secure strong faculty recommendations. Prepare for the LSAT (Law School Admission Test).

Area

Business

  • Sales
  • Management
  • Office administration

  • Human resources
  • Training and development
  • Writing/Editing

  • Underwriting and claims management
  • Entrepreneurship

Employers

  • Product and service organizations
  • Retail stores
  • Hotels
  • Restaurants

  • Wholesalers
  • Manufacturers
  • Banks and financial institutions
  • Insurance companies

  • Real estate agencies
  • Consulting firms
  • Other business corporations
  • Entrepreneurial/start up, incubators and funding organizations

Strategies

  • Earn a minor in business.
  • Develop excellent communication skills.
  • Gain experience in an area of interest through internships or other employment.
  • Obtain leadership roles in campus or community organizations.
  • Demonstrate excellent interpersonal skills and a high energy level.
  • Learn to use various technologies and software packages such as databases, spreadsheets and presentations.
  • Be prepared to start in entry level positions, such as management trainee programs.
  • Consider earning an MBA to advance into higher levels of business management.
  • Participate in campus and community “pitch” competitions and startup support organizations.

Area

Religiously Affiliated Areas

  • Clergy and other religious leaders:
    • Buddhist, Catholic, Jewish, Protestant, Islamic, Hindu, Greek Orthodox
  • Vocation as Monk or Nun
  • Chaplaincy:
    • Military
    • Institutional

  • Mission work:
    • Church development
    • Community or agricultural development
    • Educational
    • Medical
    • Metropolitan evangelism

  • Local ministries:
    • Youth ministries
    • Adult ministries
    • Leisure ministries
    • Counseling/Recovery
    • Religious education
    • Day care, children and adult
    • Food bank/Emergency ministries
    • Family life center management
  • Music-oriented ministries
  • Religious camp administration

Employers

  • Local churches, synagogues, mosques
  • Religious organizations
  • Religious communities (e.g., convents and monasteries)
  • Religious retreat centers, Christian and Buddhist
  • Denominational boards and agencies
  • Monasteries

  • All branches of military service
  • Hospitals, hospices
  • Homes for children, youth, senior citizens
  • Correctional institutions
  • Police and fire departments

  • Missions boards
  • Local churches
  • Evangelical organizations (e.g., Billy Graham Evangelistic Association)
  • Religious-based camps and youth programs

Strategies

  • Obtain general knowledge of practices, procedures, guidelines and doctrine of one’s faith.
  • Possess understanding of human spiritual and social needs.
  • Research requirements to enter leadership in the faith you want to pursue. Master of Divinity and denominational ordination are required for most clergy positions, for example.
  • Possess high moral and ethical standards.
  • Develop leadership ability and self discipline. Obtain excellent written and verbal communication skills.
  • To become a chaplain, obtain ordination and two years’ service in local church or after acceptance into branch of military service, attend chaplaincy school.
  • Obtain any needed advanced degrees, certification or licensing in area of interest for missions.
  • Seek related experience by participating with missions groups.
  • Obtain travel and cultural experience with group of interest. Foreign language skills are a plus.
  • Develop fund raising skills and contacts. People interested in religious vs. secular work possess deep faith, want more than filling one’s own personal needs and desire to make a difference.
  • May be more opportunities for specific ministries in urban areas and large religious institutions.
  • Obtain experience and contacts through extensive involvement in campus organizations or local religious institutions. Leadership on the local, state and regional level is crucial.
  • Seek camp experience to improve organization and counseling skills as well as network within the denominational/organizational structure.
  • Learn to work well with people of all different backgrounds and socioeconomic status.
  • Earn dual degrees where appropriate (e.g., music).

Area

Social/Community Services

  • Administration/Management
  • Fund raising/Development
  • Public relations

  • Policy analysis
  • Research
  • Grant writing

  • Direct service
  • Social entrepreneurship

Employers

  • Local and national nonprofit agencies
  • Foundations
  • Charitable organizations

  • Trade or professional associations
  • Special interest groups
  • Labor unions

 

  • Research organizations and think tanks
  • Government Agencies
  • Incubators, start up investors

Strategies

  • Seek courses with service learning components.
  • Supplement curriculum with courses in business, psychology, sociology, or social work.
  • Plan to volunteer and/or complete an internship.
  • Obtain leadership roles in relevant campus and community organizations.
  • Develop strong communication and research skills.
  • Learn how to write grants.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and experience in a specialty area (e.g., public health, environment, urban issues).
  • Research organizations’ values. It is critical that you are knowledgeable about and committed to the work you plan to do.
  • Investigate term of service or service corps positions as a way to gain entry into the field.
  • Consider earning a graduate degree for more job opportunities and advancement.
  • Participate in campus and community “pitch” competitions and startup support organizations.

Area

Government/Politics

  • Public policy
  • Research
  • Regional planning
  • City management

  • Intelligence
  • Foreign Service
  • Law enforcement
  • Legislative, Executive, or Judicial Services

  • Program administration
  • Elected or appointed leadership
  • Campaign management
  • Staff administration
  • Special interest advocacy

Employers

  • State and local government
  • Federal departments and agencies
  • Foreign Service
  • Federal Municipal Archives

  • National and State Endowments for the Humanities
  • Legislative, executive, or judicial officials
  • Political action committees

  • Special interest groups
  • Political parties
  • Campaigns (national, state, or local)

Strategies

  • Take courses or minor in applicable interest area(s).
  • Seek leadership roles in relevant campus organizations such as model United Nations, student government, and cross-cultural organizations.
  • Write for campus publications focused on national and international affairs.
  • Participate in national campaigns.
  • Develop computer, statistics, data analysis and other functional administrative skills.
  • Acquire foreign language competency and travel experience for international positions.
  • Complete an internship with the federal government.
  • There are a large number of specialized agencies within the federal government. Extensive research will help you fi nd the right fit.
  • Earn a graduate degree in political science or public administration for advancement.
  • Become familiar with the government application process. Utilize applicable websites and seek assistance from your college career center.

Area

Communications

  • Writing
  • Editing

  • Technical
  • Writing

  • Journalism

Employers

  • University and commerical publishing companies
  • Magazine and newspaper publishers

  • Professional and trade associations
  • Electronic media organizations

  • Websites

Strategies

  • Take courses or minor in journalism, advertising, public relations, or English.
  • Develop excellent writing, editing, and desktop publishing skills.
  • Learn how to design websites.
  • Gain related experience through internships.
  • Volunteer to help campus or local organizations with their communications.
  • Serve on college newspaper or other campus publication staffs.
  • Join relevant professional associations.

General Information

  • Philosophy students develop many transferable skills that can be can be utilized in a variety of careers and jobs, demonstrating the flexibility and capacity for growth that employers find valuable. These skills include analytical, organizational, research, as well as oral and written communication.
  • Other skills emphasized in philosophy that are attractive to employers are idea generation, problem formulation and problem solving, diverse data integration, adaptation to change, the ability to elicit hidden assumptions, persuasion, and summarization of complicated material.
  • It is important for philosophy students to identify potential career goals and seek out the experiences and education required to enter those fields.
  • An undergraduate degree qualifies one for entry-level positions in business, nonprofit organizations, and government.
  • Graduate and/or professional studies usually lead to careers in law, medicine, ministry, finance, psychology, counseling, diplomacy, ethics, and related areas.
  • Ph.D. is required for college/university teaching and research.
  • Consider earning a minor or concentration in another discipline such as: mathematics, religion, science, business, political science, women’s studies, Eastern philosophy, sustainability or environmental studies.
  • Develop aptitudes for analytical thinking, logic, and statistics in order to apply philosophy to a broad range of professions such as law, government, finance, management, consulting, and related areas.
  • Seek related summer or part-time work experience or internships in area(s) of interest.
  • Join related student or professional organizations. Work toward leadership roles.
  • Conduct informational interviews or shadow professionals in fields of interest.

Area

Education

  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Applied linguistics
  • Teacher training

  • Curriculum development
  • Test/Assessment development
  • Foreign language instruction
  • English as a Second Language (ESL) instruction

  • English to Speakers of Other Language (TESOL)
  • Instruction
  • Literacy development
  • Information/Library science

Employers

  • Universities and colleges
  • K-12 school systems

  • Language institutes
  • Community education programs
  • Testing companies (e.g., ETS)

Strategies

  • To teach in higher education, earn a doctoral degree in linguistics or a related subject such as English, philosophy, speech pathology, or foreign language.
  • As an undergraduate, maintain a high GPA and secure strong recommendations from faculty.
  • Serve as a tutor, peer mentor, or other student leader.
  • Look for opportunities to assist faculty with research.
  • Study languages, both Indo-European and non-Indo-European.
  • To be more competitive for tenure-track positions in linguistics, plan to complete a post-doc and gain experience with multiple subfields or those that are more applied. Subfields include: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, dialectology, pragmatics, and language acquisition.
  • Earn relevant graduate degrees to prepare for other fields such as, information science, ESL/TESOL, or language education.
  • Foreign language instruction requires teacher certification for K-12 and a doctoral degree for postsecondary.
  • To prepare for work with non-native English speakers, get involved with the campus or local international community. Study abroad and attend multi-cultural events on campus or in the community.
  • Research the many programs available for teaching English abroad. Consider earning a certificate or seeking specialized training to prepare for these positions.

Area

Computational Linguistics

  • Speech synthesis
  • Speech recognition
  • Natural language processing
  • Text-Content analysis

  • Machine translation
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Database or Lexicon development

  • Information extraction
  • Text mining
  • Research

Employers

  • e-Businesses (e.g., Amazon)
  • Software developers
  • Computer companies (e.g., IBM, Microsoft)

  • Natural-language processor firms
  • Search engines (e.g., Google)
  • Database developers
  • Other business firms

Strategies

  • Earn a master’s or doctoral degree in linguistics, computer science or computational linguistics.
  • Supplement undergraduate curriculum with courses in computer science.
  • Develop skills in computer programming, computer scripting, natural language processing techniques, and other relevant technologies.
  • Gain experience by completing an internship in the computer industry.
  • Read use/net or netnews groups and professional journals to understand current trends in the field.
  • Be prepared to continuously learn new computer languages and technologies to stay abreast of changes.
  • This area represents some of the higher-demand opportunities within linguistics.

Area

Government

  • Translation
  • Interpretation
  • Localization

  • Forensic linguistics
  • Cryptology
  • Intelligence

  • Analysis
  • Writing
  • Editing

Employers

  • Federal government:
    • National Security Agency
    • Central Intelligence Agency
    • Federal Bureau of Investigation
    • Foreign Service
    • Armed Forces

  • State and local government:
    • Police departments

Strategies

  • Seek leadership roles in relevant campus groups such as model United Nations, student government, and cross-cultural organizations.
  • Develop skills in computers, statistics, and data analysis.
  • Acquire foreign language competency and travel experience for international positions. Consider studying critical needs languages (e.g., Arabic, Farsi, Chinese, Russian, Spanish).
  • Complete an internship with the federal government.  There are a large number of specialized agencies within the federal government. Do extensive research in order to find the area that best fits your interests and to learn about candidate requirements.
  • Become familiar with the government application process. Utilize applicable websites and seek assistance from your college career center.

Area

Communication Disorders

  • Speech pathology
  • Language disorders
  • Audiology

  • Aural rehabilitation
  • Neurocommunicative science
  • Cognitive sciences

  • Teaching
  • Research

Employers

  • Schools, K-12
  • Universities and colleges
  • Hospitals
  • Physicians’ offices
  • Speech, language, and hearing centers
  • Developmental learning centers

  • Home healthcare offices
  • Nursing homes
  • Residential facilities
  • Health maintenance organizations
  • Private individual or group practice
  • Public health departments
  • Rehabilitation centers

  • Federal agencies:
    • Department of Veterans Affairs
    • National Institutes of Health
    • Department of Health and Human Services
    • Department of Education
    • Armed Services

Strategies

  • The study of communication disorders is interdisciplinary and draws upon linguistics, speech pathology, audiology, and psychology. Research prerequisite courses for graduate school admission and take the appropriate undergraduate classes.
  • A master’s degree from an accredited speech language pathology program is required to enter that field. A doctoral degree is commonly required for audiology. Most states require certification of speech pathologists and all states for audiologists. Obtain the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology or Audiology offered by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
  • Take courses in American Sign Language.
  • Maintain a high GPA and seek related experiences to be competitive for graduate school.
  • Learn to work well people of varying ages and backgrounds, including those with disabilities.
  • Develop patience as progress in clients may be slow.

Area

Additional Areas

  • Translation
  • Interpreting
  • Language documentation
  • Fieldwork

  • Lexicography (work with dictionaries)
  • Technical writing
  • Editing
  • Journalism

  • Medical linguistics
  • Forensic linguistics
  • Product naming
  • Consulting

Employers

  • Government agencies
  • Foreign governments
  • International businesses

  • Hospitals
  • Courts
  • Publishers: Magazine, book, textbook, dictionary
  • Internet sites

  • Manufacturers of consumer products
  • Law firms
  • Consulting firms

Strategies

  • There are many employment settings in which students can utilize a degree in linguistics.
  • Research areas of interest and seek the appropriate education, skills, and experiences to qualify for that field.
  • Some of these areas will require graduate degrees in linguistics or educational background in other disciplines.
  • Gain relevant experience through internships.

General Information

  • Linguistics is an interdisciplinary field and therefore good preparation for a wide variety of graduate programs: linguistics, speech pathology, audiology, cognitive sciences, English, law, journalism, foreign languages, etc.
  • Students who major in linguistics develop strong analytical and communication skills and the ability to debate. They are commonly required to gain proficiency in a second language.
  • Students should consider a secondary area of study such as, foreign language, computer science, psychology, or other area of interest to increase opportunities for employment or graduate school.
  • Consider study abroad and getting involved with the international community on campus. Attend language conversation tables.
  • Research career paths of interest and seek to gain the skills, experiences, and degrees necessary to work in that field.
  • Conduct informational interviews with or shadow professionals to learn about various work environments.
  • Join related professional associations as a student member.
  • Because many career paths require graduate education, learn about the graduate school admissions process and build a strong candidacy.
  • Gain relevant experience through jobs, volunteer positions, or internships.

  • Higher Education
    • Teaching
    • Research
    • Student affairs administration (e.g., international student services, study abroad, multicultural programming)
    • Student support services
    • Information/Library science

  • Primary and secondary education
  • Language services
    • Private tutoring
    • Interpreting
    • Translating

  • Community education:
    • Literacy
    • English as a second language
    • GED preparation

Employers

  • Universities and colleges
  • International schools
  • Overseas dependent schools
  • Third party study abroad providers
  • Campus cultural centers

  • Support programs (e.g., Educational Advancement Program, Upward Bound)
  • School and community libraries
  • K-12 schools, public and private
  • Federal government agencies
  • Head Start programs

  • Nonprofit organizations including those promoting literacy (e.g., VISTA)
  • Adult education programs (e.g., those focusing on GED preparation)
  • Libraries (for Latino Studies, museums)

Strategies

  • Earn a Ph.D. in order to teach and research at four-year institutions. The interdisciplinary nature of Latin American Studies makes it good preparation for advanced education in a variety of fields.
  • Obtain a master’s degree in student affairs or library/information science to prepare for those fields.
  • If interested in K-12 teaching, fulfill requirements for certification. This may involve a double major or a minor. Research alternative paths to certification such as Teach for America and other similar programs.
  • Research certification options for teaching English (TESOL, CELTA, TEFL)
  • Get involved in leadership roles on campus such as peer mentor, resident advisor, or orientation leader.
  • Join related professional associations as a student member.
  • Interact with students from Latin America. Participate in international programming on campus.
  • Plan to study, work, or volunteer in Latin American countries.
  • Develop strong communication and public speaking skills, particularly in Spanish or Portuguese.
  • Volunteer with community organizations that serve the Latino population. For example, tutor nonnative
    English speakers.
  • Secure strong recommendations from faculty, and maintain a high grade point average.
  • Assist a professor with research or take an independent study class to develop research skills.

Area

Advocacy/Nonprofit

  • Domestic and international advocacy
  • Humanitarian services
  •  Development:
    • Economic
    • Community
    • Housing

  • Disaster/Disease relief
  • HIV/AIDS advocacy
  • Policy development
  • Policy analysis
  • Program administration
  • Education
  • Volunteer coordination

  • Grant writing
  • Program management and development
  • Fundraising/Development
  • Research
  • Community education and outreach
  • Public relations and marketing

Employers

  • Community action agencies
  • Labor unions
  • Nonprofit organizations (e.g., Amigos de las Americas, Centro Hispano)
  • Social service agencies
  • Private voluntary organizations
  • Private foundations (e.g., The Boston Foundation,
    Lumina Foundation)

  • Faith based organizations (FBO’s) and churches
    (e.g., Catholic Relief Services)
  • Hospitals, medical centers and clinics (especially
    those in areas with high Latino population)
  • International aid and relief organizations
  • Non-governmental Organizations (NGO’s) (e.g., International Red Cross)

  • Federal government agencies with an international focus (e.g., Peace Corps, USAID, etc.) or a focus on community assistance (e.g., Americorps)
  • State and local government agencies
  • Special interest groups
  • Cultural heritage organizations
  • Research organizations (e.g., Pew Hispanic Center)

Strategies

  • Volunteer at local social service agencies that work with Latino communities to gain experience, demonstrate interest, and build contacts in the field.
  • Participate in an international service learning experience or church-led mission trip to Latin America.
  • Learn to speak Spanish or Portuguese, focusing on relevant technical vocabulary for your chosen field.
  • Pursue scholarship opportunities to study relevant languages, teach English, or conduct research abroad (e.g. Fulbright).
  • Get involved with cultural and international events or organizations on campus.
  • Take additional courses in social work, global studies, or other relevant areas.
  • Develop excellent research, writing, communication, and organizational skills, particularly in Spanish
    or Portuguese.
  • Learn how to motivate individuals and groups.
  • Plan to move to geographic regions where the Latino population is growing.
  • Learn how to write grants and gain an understanding of budgeting and fiscal management.
  • Investigate term of service or service corps positions as a way to gain entry into the field.
  • Research organizations’ values to find a good fit with yours.
  • Consider earning a graduate degree for more job opportunities and advancement.

Area

Human Services

  • Healthcare advocacy
  • Counseling
  • Psychotherapy
  • Mental health services

  • Case management
  • Social work
  • Vocational/Career counseling
  • Grant writing

  • Program management and development
  • Community relations
  • Fundraising/Development
  • Administration

Employers

  • Mental health institutions
  • Hospitals and clinics
  • Residential treatment facilities
  • Private and group practice

  • Correctional institutions
  • Federal, state, or local government:
    • Department of Human Services
  • Organizations that aid immigrants and refugees or focus on cultural issues

  • Youth organizations and camps (e.g., YMCA, Boys and Girls Club)
  • Nonprofit and social services organizations (e.g., United Way, Goodwill Industries, Salvation Army)
  • Faith-based programs

Strategies

  • Gain essential practical experience through part time or summer jobs and internships.
  • Volunteer with organizations that assist people of diverse backgrounds, particularly the Latino
    population.
  • Participate in training opportunities (e.g., suicide prevention or crisis hotline response).
  • Gain a firm understanding of various Latino cultures
    and how culture impacts individuals and families.
  • Become bilingual in Spanish or Portuguese in order to better assist some clients, emphasizing acquisition
    of relevant technical vocabulary.
  • Acquire knowledge of government and community resources available for those in need.
  • Research state licensure requirement in fields such
    as counseling, social work, and psychology

Area

Business and Industry

  • International business
  • International development
  • Importing/Exporting
  • Logistics
  • Banking and finance
  • Management
  • Customer service

  • Sales
  • Marketing
  • Advertising
  • Public relations
  • Labor relations
  • Training and development
  • Human resources

  • Equity and diversity functions
  • Travel and tourism
  • Real Estate
  • Consulting
  • Agriculture economics

Employers

  • Public and private corporations in various industries:
    • Banks and financial institutions
    • Insurance companies
    • Retail stores
    • Hotels and restaurants
    • Consumer goods manufacturers
    • Businesses targeting Hispanics

  • Staffing agencies
  • Consulting firms
  • Market research firms specializing in Latinos
  • Public relations agencies
  • Latin American firms operating in the U.S.
  • U.S. firms with operations in Latin America
  • Hispanic chambers of commerce
  • Minority Business Development Centers

  • Hispanic trade associations (e.g. Latin Business Association)
  • Travel agencies and tour operators
  • Convention and visitors’ bureaus
  • Organizations for research on and advancement of Latino’s in business (e.g., Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative (SLEI))

Strategies

  • Double major or minor in Business or Language & World Business (MFLL).
  • Gain business experience through internships or part-time and summer jobs.
  • Through research, identify corporations that have a reputation for reaching out to Latino populations.
  • Become bilingual in Spanish or Portuguese, emphasizing acquisition of relevant technical vocabulary.
  • Gain leadership experience through campus organizations or professional societies.
  • Understand the skills employers desire and be prepared to demonstrate them, such as
    communication (oral and written), computer, interpersonal, leadership, and teamwork.
  • Conduct informational interviews with professionals to learn more about career fields.
  • When job searching, seek employers interested in
    hiring “any major.”
  • Learn how to sell your Latin American Studies major to companies that value cultural diversity.
  • For international assignments, plan to start in U.S. based positions and gain experience with the company/industry. Usually more seasoned employees are given international assignments.
  • Earn an MBA or a graduate degree in another area of interest such as accounting or finance for more advanced opportunities.

Area

Law and Policies

  • Law:
    • Corporate practice
    • Public interest law
    • Civil law
    • International
    • Immigration law

  • Lobbying
  • Government relations
  • Elected or appointed leadership
  • Public policy
  • Research
  • Intelligence

  • Campaign management
  • Special interest advocacy
  • Program administration
  • Immigration Services

Employers

  • Law firms
  • Corporate legal departments
  • Public defenders offices
  • District attorneys

  • Public interest groups (e.g., The Center for Justice and International Law)
  • Civil rights organizations (e.g., National Council of LaRaza)
  • Legal aid

  • Sole practitioner
  • Government agencies (e.g., Department of State, foreign service)
  • Lobbying groups

Strategies

  • Obtain a law degree (J.D.) for law positions or an advanced degree in public administration, public
    policy, or international relations for government positions.
  • Supplement curriculum with relevant courses to prepare for law school (research and writing skills).
  • Participate in activities that develop strong debate and public speaking skills such as mock trials.
  • Run for office in student government or work on a political campaign.
  • Get involved with the pre-law society on campus.
  • Gain relevant experience through jobs or internships with law firms, government agencies, or mediation
    centers.
  • Maintain a high grade point average and secure strong faculty recommendations.
  • Prepare for and take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT).
  • Study abroad in a Latin American country.
  • Learn Spanish or Portuguese, specifically the relevant technical vocabulary.

Area

Media and the Arts

  • Journalism
  • Creative writing
  • Freelance writing
  • Copy writing
  • Editing

  • Research and analysis
  • Broadcasting:
    • Television
    • Radio
  • Media sales

  • Museum work
  • Arts programming
  • Art sales
  • Fundraising/Development

Employers

  • Newspapers
  • Magazines, (e.g., Hispanic, Latina)
  • Broadcast media companies including television and movie industry
  • Radio stations
  • Foreign news agencies
  • Trade, professional, or consumer publications

  • Internet sites marketed toward Latino Americans
  • Advertising agencies
  • Publishing houses
  • Large corporations
  • Freelance
  • Museums

  • Galleries
  • Organizations and centers dedicated to promoting Hispanic visual and performing arts (e.g., Latino Arts Inc., National Association of Latino Arts and Culture)
  • Smithsonian Latino Center

Strategies

  • Pair an interest in Latin American Studies with communication skills and/or language skills to write about Latinos, write on topics of interest to minorities, or for publications targeting a Latino audience.
  • Study a second field such as journalism, English, or broadcasting to prepare for a career in media.
  • For positions in the arts, consider a minor in art history or music history. Plan to pursue a relevant graduate degree such as Museum Studies.
  • Write for campus publications such as college newspapers, magazines, or department/program  newsletters. Work at campus radio or television stations.
  • Intern with a publishing house, magazine, radio or television station depending upon area of interest.
  • Create a portfolio of writing samples, especially those that have been published. For other areas, create a website or digital portfolio to promote skills to potential employers.
  • Seek opportunities for recognition and networking through writing contests and freelance writing
    submissions.
  • Become familiar with the proposal and submission process involved in freelance writing.
  • When job searching, research media outlets to find those that target Latinos.
  • Volunteer in local museums or galleries.
  • Travel to Latin American countries and visit local
    museums and cultural attractions.
  • Learn to speak Spanish or Portuguese and develop
    relevant writing and communication skills in the
    language.

General Information

  • Latin American Studies provides an interdisciplinary background that helps students develop analytical, critical thinking, and writing skills while gaining knowledge about the cultures, histories, and languages of Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean.
  • When paired with a major in another field, Latin American Studies can enhance the employability of a student because of a deeper understanding of the Latino experience which many organizations will value. Training in this field can lead to a better appreciation of certain customers or clients.
  • Some students may choose to pursue Latin American Studies because they enjoy the subject but wish to pursue careers requiring “any major.” In this scenario, it is critical to develop skills relevant to targeted field through internships, part-time or summer jobs, or volunteer experiences.
  • Latin American Studies majors are excellent candidates for a number of graduate school options because of their broad liberal arts background as well as specific interests that may set them apart from other students. For those wishing to pursue graduate education, maintain a high GPA, establish relationships with faculty to secure strong recommendations, and gain experience through volunteer, work, or research opportunities.
  • Travel as much as possible to Latin America to experience it first-hand. Complete at least one study abroad experience. In the U.S., look for ways to interact with people from Latin America who are living in or visiting the States.
  • More job opportunities may exist in parts of the United States where the Latino population is the largest or growing such as Florida, Texas, and California.
  • Read and stay abreast of politics and current events in regions of interest.

Area

Education

  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Administration
  • Student support services
  • Student affairs

  • Multicultural programming
  • Study abroad/International student services
  • Information/Library science

  • Religious life programming
  • Campus ministry

Employers

  • Universities and colleges: Public, private, or religiously affiliated
  • Secondary schools
  • College and university Hillels

  • Hebrew schools
  • Campus cultural centers

  • School and community libraries
  • Community organizations

Strategies

  • Earn a doctorate degree for teaching and research at colleges and universities.
  • Earn a master’s degree for positions in student affairs administration or library/information sciences.
  • Obtain certification/licensure to teach in public secondary schools. Choose a double major in an area such as history or mathematics.
  • Complete a Rabbinical program, approximately 4 to 7 years, depending on the branch of Judaism you wish to practice, to become a Rabbi for campus ministry.
  • Seek campus leadership positions such as Peer Mentor, Resident Assistant, or Orientation Leader.
  • Volunteer to assist a faculty member with research.
  • Develop relationships with faculty to secure strong recommendations.
  • Maintain a high GPA to gain admittance to graduate school.

Area

Social Services

  • Case management
  • Counseling
  • Rehabilitation
  • Vocational training

  • Programming
  • Crisis services (e.g., pregnancy, housing)
  • Social work
  • Administration
  • Volunteer services

  • Fundraising
  • Grant writing
  • Community management
  • Community outreach/Advocacy

Employers

  • Community centers
  • Youth organizations and camps
  • Synagogues

  • Shelters
  • Correctional institutions
  • Residential treatment facilities

  • Migrant service providers
  • Immigrant and refugee service providers
  • Nonprofit and social services organizations
  • Advocacy groups (e.g., Jewish Community Relations Council)

Strategies

  • Take courses in psychology, social work, or child and family studies. Consider a double major or minor.
  • Plan to earn a graduate degree in counseling, social work, or psychology to provide therapy.
  • Gain experience through volunteer opportunities, internships, and/or part-time jobs. Develop multicultural competence.
  • Participate in training opportunities (e.g., suicide prevention or crisis hotline response).
  • Develop fundraising and grant-writing skills. These are valued by non-profit agencies.
  • Learn Hebrew to work with immigrant and migrant populations.

Area

Government, Law, and Politics

  • Law:
    •     International
    •     Corporate
    •     Public interest
    •     Civil

  • International relations
  • Foreign service
  • Lobbying
  • Government relations
  • Public policy

  • Research
  • Special interest advocacy
  • Program administration
  • Immigration Services

Employers

  • Law firms
  • Corporate legal departments
  • Public defender offices

  • District attorneys
  • Public interest groups
  • Legal aid

  • Sole practitioner
  • Government agencies
  • Lobbying groups

Strategies

  • Obtain a J.D. for law positions or an advanced degree in political science, public administration, or public policy for government positions.
  • Consider a double major or minor in areas such as economics, political science, or history.
  • Maintain a high GPA and secure strong faculty recommendations.
  • Prepare and take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT).
  • Gain relevant experience through jobs and/or internships with law firms, government agencies, or mediation centers depending on your specific interests and career goals.
  • Consider studying abroad in Israel to gain international experience.

Area

Business and Industry

  • Human resources
  • Training and development
  • Equity and diversity functions

  • Management
  • Sales
  • Marketing

  • Public relations
  • Event planning
  • Consulting

Employers

  • Public and private corporations in various industries:
    •     Banks and financial institutions
    •     Insurance companies
    •     Retail stores
    •     Hotels and restaurants

  • Staffing agencies
  • Marketing companies

  • Public relations agencies
  • Consulting firms

Strategies

  • Learn how to sell the Judaic studies major to business employers that value employees who understand and appreciate cultural diversity.
  • Understand the top skills employers desire and be prepared to demonstrate them, such as communication, computer, interpersonal, leadership, and problem-solving.
  • Double major or minor in business.
  • Gain related experience through internships or part-time jobs.
  • Get involved in relevant student organizations and seek leadership roles.
  • When job searching, seek employers interested in hiring ‘any major.’
  • Earn an MBA or graduate degree in another area of interest for more advanced opportunities.

Area

Communication and Arts

  • Journalism
  • Publishing
  • Writing

  • Editing
  • Advertising
  • Commercial art

  • Museum work:
    •     Curatorship
    •     Exhibition design

Employers

  • Jewish publishing houses and production companies
  • Radio, television, and film producers

  • Publications and internet sites marketed toward Judiasm (e.g., KTAV Publishing House, Jewish Professionals Network)
  • Local synagogues

  • Advertising and public relations agencies
  • Museums and galleries
  • Large corporations

Strategies

  • Plan to complete one or more internships in this area to prepare for professional jobs and to build a network of relevant professionals.
  • Based on interest areas, take courses in English, journalism, communications, or art history. Consider a double major or minor for specialized experience.
  • Develop excellent writing and editing skills.
  • Work for campus publications such as newspapers, radio stations, magazines, or department/program newsletters.
  • Volunteer to tutor students in a writing center.
  • Seek opportunities for recognition and networking through writing contests and freelance writing submissions.
  • Develop a portfolio of writing or art samples.
  • Be willing to move to a larger metropolitan area for more job opportunities.
  • Obtain a graduate degree for museum work.

Area

Religiously Affiliated

  • Religious leaders (e.g., Rabbi, Chazzan)
  • Administration
  • Marketing/Advertising/Community relations
  • Fundraising

  • Financial planning
  • Social event coordination
  • Education

  • Chaplaincy:
    • Military
    • Hospital
    • Institutional
    • Youth services
    • Recruiting
    • Mentoring

Employers

  • Synagogues
  • Jewish organizations

  • Youth programs
  • Religiously-affiliated nonprofit organizations

Strategies

  • Complete Rabbinical school, approximately 4 to 7 years, to become a Rabbi, e.g. The Rabbinical School of The Jewish Theological Seminary. It is important to research requirements to enter religiously-affiliated leadership positions.
  • Become proficient in Hebrew.
  • Possess high moral and ethical standards.
  • Develop leadership ability and self-discipline.
  • Hone communication skills, both oral and written.
  • Obtain experience and contacts through extensive involvement in campus and/or community organizations.
  • Often more opportunities exist in urban areas and large institutions.

General Information

  • Judaic Studies provides an interdisciplinary background and equips students with an understanding of global issues and trends in historical and contemporary contexts. This understanding of multiculturalism is valued by employers in industries such as education, government, and business.
  • Judaic Studies majors are excellent candidates for a number of graduate school options because of their broad liberal arts background and specific interests that set them apart from other students. Research areas of interest for specific program requirements.
  • Consider obtaining a double major or minor in another area to demonstrate specialized interests and potentially increase your job prospects.
  • The major helps students develop transferable skills such as critical thinking, writing, and communication skills. Be prepared to talk about these skills with future employers.
  • Study abroad in Israel to gain international experience.
  • Obtaining relevant experience through internships and/or volunteer opportunities is critical to finding employment. Also join relevant organizations and seek leadership roles.

Area

Education

  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Administration
  • Admissions
  • Financial Aid
  • Academic Advising and Student Support Services
  • Development
  • Alumni Affairs

  • International Education and Study Abroad
  • Information/Library Science
  • Student Life:
    • Residence Life
    • Student Activities
    • Orientation
    • Leadership
    • Greek Life
    • Multicultural Affairs

  • Primary and Secondary Education:
    • Teaching
    • Administration
    • Library Sciences
  • Community Education:
    • Literacy
    • English as a Second Language
    • GED Preparation
    • Tutoring

Employers

  • Universities and colleges
  • Academic support programs, (e.g., Educational Advancement Program, Upward Bound)
  • School and community libraries
  • K-12 schools, public and private

  • Head Start programs
  • Private learning centers
  • Test preparation organizations
  • Adult education programs, (e.g., those focusing on GED preparation)

  • Nonprofit organizations including those promoting literacy, (e.g., VISTA)
  • Language institutes, local and abroad
  • Museums

Strategies

  • Earn a Ph.D. to teach and research at four-year institutions. Some two-year institutions may accept a master’s degree. The interdisciplinary nature of liberal arts and humanities is good preparation for advanced education in a variety of fields.
  • Obtain a master’s degree in student affairs, higher education administration, or library/ information science to prepare for those fields.
  • If interested in K-12 teaching, fulfill requirements for certification. This may involve a double major or a minor. Research alternative paths to certification such as Teach for America and other similar programs.
  • Get involved in leadership roles on campus including peer mentor, resident advisor, orientation leader, or tutor.
  • Volunteer with community organizations.
  • Join related professional associations as a student member.
  • Develop strong communication, public speaking, and foreign language skills. Build cultural competence.
  • Secure strong recommendations from faculty, and maintain a high grade point average. Assist a professor with research or take an independent study class to develop research skills.

Area

Advocacy

  • Domestic and International Advocacy
  • Humanitarian Services
  • Development:
    • Economic
    • Community
    • Housing

  • Disaster/Disease Relief
  • HIV/AIDS Advocacy
  • Policy Development
  • Program Administration
  • Education

  • Volunteer Coordination
  • Grant Writing
  • Fundraising/Development
  • Research

Employers

  • Community action agencies
  • Nonprofit organizations
  • Private voluntary organizations

  • Faith based organizations (FBO’s)
  • International aid and relief organizations
  • Non-governmental Organizations (NGO’s), (e.g., International Red Cross)

  • Federal government agencies with an international focus, (e.g., Peace Corps, USAID) or community assistance focus, (e.g., Americorps)
  • State and local government agencies
  • Research organizations

Strategies

  • Gain experience through extensive volunteering or by completing an internship; these experiences are critical to finding full-time positions.
  • Participate in an international service learning experience or church-led mission trip.
  • Get involved with cultural events or organizations on campus.
  • Take additional courses in social work, global studies, or other relevant areas.
  • Develop excellent research, writing, communication, and organizational skills. Learn how to motivate individuals and groups.
  • Research organizations’ values to find a good fit with yours. It is critical that you are knowledgeable about and committed to the work you’re going to do.

Area

Social Services

  • Counseling
  • Psychotherapy
  • Mental Health Services

  • Case Management
  • Programming
  • Community Relations

  • Fundraising/Development
  • Administration

Employers

  • Mental health institutions
  • Hospitals and clinics
  • Residential treatment facilities
  • Private and group practice

  • Correctional institutions
  • Federal, state, or local government:
    • Department of Human Services
  • Organizations that aid immigrants, migrant workers, and refugees or focus on cultural issues
  • Youth organizations and camps, (e.g., the Y and Boys and Girls Clubs).

  • Nonprofit and social services organizations:
    • United Way
    • Goodwill Industries
    • Salvation Army
  • Church-based programs

Strategies

  • Supplement curriculum with courses in psychology, social work, or child and family studies.
  • Obtain a graduate degree in psychology, counseling, or social work for increased counseling opportunities or advancement into administrative work.
  • Gain essential practical experience through part-time or summer jobs and internships.
  • Volunteer with organizations that assist people of diverse backgrounds.
  • Participate in training opportunities, (e.g., suicide prevention or crisis hotline response).
  • Acquire knowledge of government and community resources available for those in need.

Area

Media and Arts

  • Journalism
  • Creative Writing
  • Freelance Writing
  • Copy Writing
  • Editing

  • Research and Analysis
  •  Broadcasting:
    • Television
    • Radio

  • Media Sales
  • Museum Work
  • Arts Programming
  • Art Sales
  • Fundraising/Development

Employers

  • Newspapers
  • Magazines
  • Broadcast media companies including television and movie industry
  • Radio stations
  • Foreign news agencies

  • Trade, professional, or consumer publications
  • Internet marketing sites
  • Advertising agencies
  • Publishing houses
  • Large corporations

  • Museums
  • Galleries
  • Organizations and centers devoted to the promotion of the arts
  • Smithsonian Institution
  • Self-employed, freelance

Strategies

  • Study a second field such as journalism, English, or broadcasting to prepare for a career in media.
  • For positions in the arts, consider a minor in art history. Plan to pursue a relevant graduate degree such as museum studies.
  • Write for campus publications such as college newspapers, magazines, or department/program newsletters. Work at campus radio or television stations.
  • Use your interests and communication skills to write about topics of interest for specific publications, (e.g., local sport magazines).
  • Intern with a publishing house, magazine, radio or television station depending upon area of interest.
  • Create a portfolio of writing samples, especially those that have been published. For other areas, create a website or digital portfolio to promote skills to potential employers.
  • Seek opportunities for recognition and networking through writing contests and freelance writing submissions.
  • Become familiar with the proposal and submission process involved in freelance writing.

Area

Law and Government

  • Law:
    • Corporate Practice
    • Public Interest Law
    • Civil Law
  • Lobbying

  • Government Relations
  • Elected or Appointed Leadership
  • Public Policy
  • Research

  • Intelligence
  • Campaign Management
  • Special Interest Advocacy
  • Program Administration

Employers

  • Law firms
  • Corporate legal departments
  • Public defenders offices

  • District attorneys
  • Public interest groups
  • Civil rights organizations
  • Legal aid

  • Sole practitioner
  • Government agencies
  • Lobbying groups

Strategies

  • Obtain the J.D. for law positions or an advanced degree in public administration, public policy, or international relations for government positions.
  • Supplement curriculum with relevant courses to prepare for law school.
  • Participate in activities that develop strong debate and public speaking skills such as mock trial.
  • Get involved with the pre-law society on campus.
  • Gain relevant experience through jobs or internships with law firms, government agencies, or mediation centers.
  • Maintain a high grade point average and secure strong faculty recommendations.
  • Prepare for and take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT).
  • Apply for federal government internship programs while in school.
  • The Foreign Service requires passage of the Foreign Service Exam, after obtaining a master’s degree or significant work experience.

Area

Business

  • Financial Services and Banking
  • Management
  • Customer Service
  • Sales and Marketing

  • Advertising and Public Relations
  • Human Resources
  • Training and Development
  • Equity and Diversity Functions

  • International Business
  • Importing/Exporting
  • Travel and Tourism
  • Consulting

Employers

  • Public and private corporations in various industries:
    • Banks and financial institutions
    • Insurance companies
    • Retail stores
    • Hotels and restaurants
    • Consumer goods manufacturers
    • Multinational businesses

  • Staffing agencies
  • Consulting firms
  • Market research firms

  • Public relations agencies
  • Travel agencies and tour operators
  • Convention and visitors’ bureaus

Strategies

  • Double major or minor in business.
  • Gain business experience through internships or part-time and summer jobs.
  • Join campus organizations or professional societies and seek leadership roles.
  • Understand the skills employers’ desire and be prepared to demonstrate them, such as communication (oral and written), computer, interpersonal, leadership, and teamwork.
  • Conduct informational interviews with professionals to learn more about career fields.
  • Earn an MBA or a graduate degree in another area of interest for more advanced opportunities.
  • When job searching, seek employers interested in hiring “any major.”
  • For international assignments, plan to start in U.S. based positions and gain experience with the company/industry. Usually more seasoned employees are given international assignments.

General Information

  • Liberal studies and humanities provide an interdisciplinary background that helps students develop analytical, critical thinking, and writing skills while gaining knowledge about American and foreign cultures and histories.
  • When paired with a major in another field, humanities can enhance the employability of a student because of a deeper understanding of cultural and historical backgrounds and analytical thinking, writing, and communication skills.
  • Because liberal studies and humanities are broad-based, interdisciplinary majors, it is important to develop skills relevant to targeted fields through internships, part-time or summer jobs, or volunteer experiences.
  • These majors are excellent candidates for a number of graduate school options because of their broad liberal arts background as well as specific interests that may set them apart from other students. For those wishing to pursue graduate education, maintain a high GPA, establish relationships with faculty to secure strong recommendations, and gain experience through volunteer, work, or research opportunities.

Area

Local and State Government

  • Public policy
  • Regional planning
  • City or town management

  • Legislative, executive, or judicial services
  • Program administration
  • General aervices

  • Community affairs
  • Social services
  • Law enforcement

Employers

  • Counties
  • Cities
  • Municipalities
  • Townships

  • Municipal archives
  • Libraries
  • Museums, parks, and historic sites
  • Arts and humanities councils

  • School districts
  • Departments of state government
  • Legislative agencies
  • Court systems

Strategies

  • Conduct research that could be useful to your community.  Get involved in civic organizations and events and seek leadership roles.
  • Employment opportunities in local government tend to follow population trends in terms of growth and decline. Check statistics on growing communities to find the most opportunities. Be prepared to relocate.
  • Develop a network of contacts through referrals and informational interviews.
  • Complete an internship in a government agency.
  • Participate in local or national election campaigns.
  • Research government application processes and learn how to best represent yourself as an applicant.

Area

Federal Government

  • Public Policy
  • Research
  • Intelligence

  • Foreign service
  • Law enforcement
  • General services

  • Legislative, executive, or judicial services
  • Program administration

Employers

  • There are over 170 federal departments and agencies:
    • The Smithsonian Institute
    • National Archives and Records
    • Library of Congress
    • National Park Service
    • Federal Bureau of Investigation
    • Central Intelligence Agency
    • Foreign Service

  • Do extensive research in order to find the area that best fits your interests.

Strategies

  • Take courses or minor in applicable interest area(s).
  • Seek leadership roles in relevant campus organizations such as model United Nations, student government, and cross-cultural groups.
  • Write for campus publications focused on national and international affairs.
  • Complete a thesis to demonstrate research and writing skills, as well as the ability to think critically and analytically.
    Maintain an excellent undergraduate academic record and consider earning a graduate degree.
  • Participate in national campaigns.
  • Develop skills in computers, statistics, and data analysis.
  • Acquire foreign language competency and travel experience for international positions.
  • Complete an internship with the federal government.
  • Become familiar with the government application process. Utilize applicable websites and seek assistance from your college career center.

Area

Politics

  • Elected or appointed leadership
  • Campaign management

  • Staff administration
  • Special interest advocacy

  • Political advising
  • Lobbying

Employers

  • Legislative, executive, or judicial officials
  • National, state, or local government
  • Political action committees

  • Political parties
  • Campaigns: national, state, or local
  • Industrial, educational, and public interest groups

  • Lobbying organizations
  • Large business firms

Strategies

  • Volunteer to work with public interest groups, political campaigns, political associations, or community service projects.
  • Be prepared to begin a political career as a volunteer before moving to paid positions.
  • Many elected public officials begin careers in other fields (law, medicine, business) before campaigning for office.
  • Gain experience and make contacts through internships with government agencies or legislatures.
  • Become involved in campus political groups, student government, or student publications.  Seek leadership roles or elected positions.
  • Take courses in statistics, public policy, or other specific interest areas.

Area

Law

  • Prosecution
  • Defense
  • Contractual

  • Corporate
  • Nonprofit or public interest
  • Government

  • Mediation
  • Other specialties
  • Law assistance

Employers

  • Law firms
  • Federal, state, and local government
  • Private practice
  • Corporations

  • Special interest groups
  • Universities and colleges
  • Legal aid societies

  • Nonprofit and public interest organizations:
    • ACLU
    • NAACP Legal Defense Fund
    • Legal Services Corporation
  • Legal clinics
  • Other private legal services

Strategies

  • Plan on attending law school or a paralegal training school/program depending on area of interest.
  • Develop strong research skills and attention to detail.
  • Participate in debate or forensic team to hone communication skills.
  • Choose courses or a minor to specialize in a particular area of law, (e.g., a minor in business for a career in corporate law).
  • Gain experience and build skills through part-time jobs, summer work, or internships in organizations related to your particular interests.
  • Shadow an attorney to learn more about the field and various specialties.
  • Get involved in pre-law and mock trial organizations.
  • Volunteer with a public advocacy group.
  • Seek training and experience with mediation and conflict resolution.
  • Maintain a high grade point average and secure strong faculty recommendations. Prepare for the LSAT (Law School Admission Test).

Area

Nonprofit

  • Administration
  • Management
  • Public relations

  • Program coordination
  • Fund raising/development
  • Grant writing

  • Writing/Editing
  • Volunteer coordination
  • Community education

Employers

  • History museums and historical sites
  • Historical associations and societies
  • Cultural heritage organizations
  • Historical projects

  • Research and service institutions
  • Libraries
  • Educational institutions
  • Local and national nonprofit agencies

  • Trade or professional associations
  • Special interest groups
  • Nonprofit organizations

Strategies

  • Gain experience through extensive volunteering or by completing an internship; these experiences are critical to finding full-time positions.
  • Supplement curriculum with courses in anthropology, sociology, art history, or foreign languages.
  • Obtain leadership roles in relevant campus and community organizations.
  • Develop strong communication and research skills.
  • Gain an understanding of budgeting and fiscal management.  Learn how to write grants.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and experience in a specialty area, time period, or geographic locale.
  • Research organizations’ values to find a good fit with yours. It is critical that you are knowledgeable about and committed to the work you’re going to do.
  • Investigate term of service or service corps positions as a way to gain entry into the field.
  • Consider earning a graduate degree for more job opportunities and advancement.

Area

Information Science/Curatorial and Archival Management

  • Functions:
    • Acquisition, preservation, arrangement, cataloguing/categorizing, exhibition/installation, describing, analyzing, authenticating, maintaining records, library administration, research, education

Employers

  • Museums
  • Historical homes
  • Art galleries
  • Libraries:
    • College, university, professional schools
    • Public, central and branches
    • Public and private K-12 schools

  • Special collections
  • Historical societies
  • Universities and colleges
  • State and local government

  • Federal government, particularly the National Archives and Records Administration
  • Corporations
  • Non-profit organizations
  • Research institutions

Strategies

  • Earn a graduate degree in museum studies, conservation, information science, or related area. Research prerequisites and take the necessary courses. The most competitive candidates may have more than one graduate degree.
  • Acquire a strong background in technology.
  • Obtain an internship in a related organization.
  • Volunteer at campus or community museums or libraries.
  • Get involved with relevant student organizations.
  • Develop excellent written and oral communication skills, organizational skills, and an attention to detail.
  • Learn about grant writing, budgeting, and legal issues surrounding historical artifacts.
  • Attend professional conferences, seminars, and trainings.
  • Earn the “Certified Archivist” designation.
  • Most curators specialize in a material or objects.

Area

Education

  • Primary and secondary:
    • Teaching
    • Administration
    • Library services

  • Higher education:
    • Teaching, research, information/library services, administration, student support services, admissions, financial aid, advising, development, student affairs, alumni affairs
  • Community education

Employers

  • K-12 schools, public and private
  • Boards of education
  • Four-year colleges and universities
  • Two-year and community colleges

  • Technical schools
  • Medical and professional schools
  • Museums historical sites
  • Arboretums, gardens, and conservatories

  • Camps
  • National and state parks

Strategies

  • Complete a teacher preparation program to teach in the public school system.
  • Obtain teaching certificate/license for desired subject area and/or grade level. Requirements for certification/licensure vary by state. Seek multiple certifications to increase employability.
  • Private schools may not require certification or licensure but may prefer candidates with graduate degrees in subject areas.
  • Seek experience with youth through summer jobs at camps, churches, or other community organizations.
  • Develop excellent presentation and communication skills.
  • Become skilled in the use of multimedia.
  • Learn how to develop curriculum and workshops.
  • Volunteer or intern in an organization of interest.
  • A doctoral degree is required to teach and research at four-year institutions or to enter the highest levels of university administration. A master’s or Ph.D. degree is required to teach at two-year schools.
  • Earn a master’s degree in student personnel, student development, counseling, or library/ information sciences for student affairs, higher education administration, and librarian positions.
  • Maintain a high grade point average and secure strong faculty recommendations.
  • Gain related experience on campus through student leadership opportunities such as Peer Mentors, Resident Assistants, or Orientation Leaders.
  • For community education, become an expert in a particular subject and build a local reputation.

Area

Business

  • Sales
  • Management
  • Office administration
  • Human resources

  • Training and development
  • Public relations
  • Writing/Editing

Employers

  • Product and service organizations
  • Retail stores
  • Hotels
  • Restaurants

  • Wholesalers
  • Manufacturers
  • Banks and financial institutions
  • Insurance companies

  • Real estate agencies
  • Consulting firms
  • Other business corporations

Strategies

  • Earn a minor in business.
  • Develop excellent communication skills.
  • Gain experience in an area of interest through internships or other employment.
  • Obtain leadership roles in campus or community organizations.
  • Demonstrate excellent interpersonal skills and a high energy level.
  • Hone computer skills and learn software packages including databases, spreadsheets, and presentations.
  • Be prepared to start in entry level positions, such as management trainee programs.
  • Consider earning an MBA to advance into higher levels of business management, consulting, research, and brand management.

Area

Media

  • Editing
  • Reporting
  • Circulation

  • Sales
  • Publishing
  • Electronic media

  • Public relations
  • News programming

Employers

  • Newspapers:
    • national, local, trade
  • News departments of local, public, and commercial radio and television stations

  • Wire services
  • Magazines and journals
  • Internet sites
  • National, state, or regional radio networks

  • Independent radio syndications
  • Textbook or commercial publishing houses

Strategies

  • Complete a double major or minor in journalism or broadcasting/electronic media.
  • Obtain an internship or work experience with a newspaper, magazine, radio station, or television station.
  • Join the college newspaper, yearbook, or other publication staff.
  • Become proficient in desktop publishing and photography.
  • Learn HTML and other computer programs to prepare for online work.
  • Develop excellent verbal and written communication skills through communications courses or other writing intensive coursework.
  • Join professional associations as a student member.
  • Create a portfolio of published writing samples.
  • Develop a professional network and become aware of various social medias.

General Information

  • A major in history provides a broad, liberal arts education. Develop a career goal, and then obtain the skills, experiences, and education necessary to enter that field.
  • An undergraduate degree in history is good preparation for graduate study in history, as well as other areas such as, law, public administration, or business. Research the prerequisites for the degree of interest and tailor program of study to meet curricular requirements.
  • Part-time and summer jobs, internships, and volunteer positions are critical to gaining the experience and skills that employers seek.
  • Obtain leadership roles in school or community organizations. Get involved in student government, mock trial, debate team, or Model United Nations.
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills are imperative for most careers related to history, politics, or government.
  • Prepare to develop a specialty area including both academic training and work experience for history related careers. Develop patience, persistence, and drive to obtain history related jobs.
  • Gain experience in fundraising and grant writing techniques. Nonprofit and educational organizations are often funded in this manner.
  • Conduct informational interviews to learn about careers of interest and develop a network contacts.
  • Research websites and books that address various job opportunities, hiring processes, and pay structure.